Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 28th International Conference on Psychiatry & Mental Health Melbourne, Australia.

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Day 2 :

  • Psychiatry & Psychology practice

Session Introduction

Behailu Beshir

Department of Psychology, Wolaita Sodo University, Wolaita Sodo, Ethiopia

Title: The efficacy of cognitive behavioral group counseling in reducing Aggressiveness and Impulsivity among recidivists
Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

The present study aims to examine the efficacy of cognitive behavioral group counseling in reducing aggressiveness and impulsivity among recidivists. The study was conducted at Sodo and Arba Minch prisons, Ethiopia. This quasi-experimental study used a pre and post-test research design with a control group. During the first stage, the researcher designed and administered self-made instrument to identify recidivists and cause for recidivism. The result revealed that there were 64 and 59 recidivists at Sodo and Arba Minch prisons respectively. Further, the results showed that behaviors related to recidivism were aggressiveness and impulsivity. Aggression (Buss & Perry, 1992) and Impulsivity (Barratt, 1995) questionnaires were used for measuring aggressiveness and impulsivity. Recidivists with a history of three or more imprisonment were considered for the study. So, 41 recidivists of Sodo prison were considered in experimental group and 39 recidivists of Arba Minch prison in control group. Participants in the experimental group received group counseling for eight weeks, one day per week, for an hour per session, while the control group never received any type of counseling program. After a period of two months the same scales were administered again to both experimental and control groups. The paired t-test result showed that both aggressiveness and impulsivity significantly reduced after group counseling among recidivists in the experimental group (P<0.001), where as there was no change in the control group. Moreover, the correlation analysis result revealed that aggressiveness and impulsivity are highly related to each other (P=0.001). This study concludes that cognitive behavioral group counseling is a good therapy for reducing aggressiveness and impulsivity.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Formerly a Pediatrician, he has practiced as a Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist for 22 years. The current focus of his work is capacity building, and enhancing mental health using Mindfulness as the foundation. He is consultant Psychiatrist with the Healthy Minds/Healthy Children (HMHC) program in Calgary and a Core Committee Member of the Alberta Health Services Addiction and Mental Health Strategic Clinical Network.Mindfulness is a core human capacity and has been shown to enhance all domains of human experience by increasing awareness, opening new possibilities in relating to ourselves and improving the quality of both our interior and exterior world.His a vision is to incorporate a “Human Curriculum” into all of our lives and educational institutions. With mindful practice, we better understand how our brain and mind works and appreciate the fullness of our humanity in all it’s dimensions ( Mental, Emotional, Physical, Spiritual ).  This in turn leads invites us to live more intentional and significant lives.Allan has delivered presentations and led Mindfulness workshops with educators and administrators, at Teacher conventions, Medical conferences, Psychiatry residents, Post Graduate University students, Wellness Center staff at the University of Calgary, the City of Calgary Fire Department Leadership team and Calgary Catholic Immigrant society.

Abstract:

It is a given that empathy is a worthy and necessary part of any healing practice practice and perhaps nowhere more heartfelt than in the field of mental health. This is taken for granted and never questioned. Yet, who decides if empathy is always needed and where should it live? When was it promised and by whom?   This presentation will explore the virtuous and highly treasured goal of relieving suffering, both for oneself and others. With the clarity that a mindful awareness of our own necessary fictions can bring, we will discuss the construct of and the various facets of empathy. The initial promise of empathy, who some would argue is at the core of caring, will be examined from the moment of it’s arising, through the desire grounded in the “rescue fantasy” of healers, to the ultimate realization that suffering itself may offer it’s own paths to healing. Is it possible that empathy is already embedded in suffering? With a hermeneutic lens we may see that some of our caring  is a fictional construct and that suffering and empathy have their own relationship, beyond our promises. This presentation will include quotes from persons who willingly suffered their humanity and found relief in completed suicide.

Kalyani Das Sarkar

Medical Department of Steel Authority of India Limited

Title: SCENARIO OF ADOLESC ENT PSYCI4I ATRY IN INDIA
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Kalyani Das Sarkar has completed her MBBS Degree from the University of Calcutta in 1983 then she completed her DPM (Diploma in Psychological Medicine) from the University of Calcutta. She worked in Ordnance Health Services, Government of India. Then she joined in the Medical Department of Steel Authority of India Limited (SAIL) and presently working as Senior Deputy Director (Medical) in SAIL

Abstract:

Adolescence is the period is hen different Physiological changes occur in both girls and boys . These Psychological changes have impact on body and mind. Different hormonal changes take place. Usually it is adapted in most of the Adolescents but in some others it may develop some problems which are actually psychological in most cases. Psychological problems like Cognitive Disorders, Affective Disorders, Eating Disorders, Addiction, Anxiety Disorders, Sexual problems etc. may start. Adolescence is the period of overall change in life style, education etc. Parents become very much protective towards their children and over-protection also causes different behavioral problems. Social stigma becomes obstacle for proper diagnosis and treatment. This creates a social as well as personal problem for the affected adolescents irrespective of socio- economic class .More awareness is required to overcome.

  • Mental health education and Training
Speaker
Biography:

Begum ENGUR has completed her BSc Psychology degree in Istanbul with high honor and as an International Baccalaureate Scholarship student. During the undergraduate years, she served as volunteer and did internships in various CAMHS settings. In addition to the works, she completed numerous trainings, earned certificates from institutions worldwide in the same area of interest. After completing BSc degree, she completed her MSc Child Adolescent Mental Health at King’s College London, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience. During MSc, she completed her clinical placement as a trainee psychologist at South London and Maudsley NHS - Conduct, Adoption and Fostering Team. There, she worked with adopted/fostered children having emotional, behavioral difficulties, anxiety disorders, pervasive developmental disorders, attachment disorders, traumatic stress and got trained & worked on parenting intervention. Some of her academic works has been published in various international journals and her MSc dissertation as a book by Scholar’s Press

Abstract:

Anorexia is, simply stated, starving you to death. It comes from an obsessive fear and a desperate desire to maintain control over that fear. The ultimate symptoms of Anorexia Nervosa include refusal to maintain minimally normal body weight for corresponding height, body type, age and activity level; intense fear of weight gain or being fat; feeling fat or overweight despite dramatic weight loss; loss of menstrual periods in post pubescent women and girls; excessive exercise & restrictive eating (or binge and purge type); extreme concern with body weight and shape.‘ Every holiday it was always the same. Endless, insipid observations about her appearance- how big she’d become, how tall she was getting. And then last year that comment by her uncle, spoken in a whisper when no one else was around, about how much weight she’d gained. She shivered in disgust every time she thought of it.I was thinking about food or about what I’d just eaten or what I was just about to get rid of every minute of every half hour of every day. It was all consuming. That is the obsession of an eating disorder. It takes over your life; it took over my life. The cost has been enormous.’’

  • Psychiatry

Session Introduction

Rodrigo Chiavaro da Fonseca

Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

Title: Frequency of brain tissue donation for research after suicide
Speaker
Biography:

Rodrigo Chiavaro da Fonseca is a medical student, interested in research since the beginning of college. Today he is working in multiple projects, such as “Evaluation of Biochemical and Molecular Parameters of the Brain and their Clinical Correlations in Individuals Who Committed Suicide”, “Brazil’s Suicide Rate from 2000 to 2014 Stratified by Genre and Age” and “Hospital Waste: Is it possible to minimize the environmental impact of a big university hospital?”. He is also teaching as monitor in “Promotion and Protection of Elderlys and Adults’ Health” class since 2016, August. Rewarded with the Award of Best Oral Presentation at the 36th Scientific Week of HCPA in 2016.

Abstract:

Obtaining central nervous system tissue is essential for neurobiological research in mental health. There is a growing demand for the availability of human brain tissue, with greater interest in using these tissues for investigation of basic biological processes associated with mental illness. In the current scenario, however, brain tissue biobanks dedicated to psychiatric disorders are extremely scarce. Little is known about organ donation for research. The main reasons and facilitators found for donation to biobanks are: 1) the desire to help others; 2) open dialogue within the family about the organ donation process; and 3) a desire to contribute to medical progress.Our objective is to describe the frequency of brain tissue donation for research purposes by families of individuals that committed suicide.We included all requests for brain tissue donation to a brain biorepository made to the families of individuals aged 18-60 years who had committed suicide between March 2014 and February 2016. Cases presenting with brain damage due to acute trauma were excluded.Fifty-six cases of suicide were reported. Of these, 24 fulfilled the exclusion criteria, and 11 others were excluded because no next of kin was found to provide informed consent. Of the 21 remaining cases, brain tissue donation was authorized in nine (tissue fragments in seven and the entire organ in two). The sample was composed mainly of men, with a mean age of 39 years. Those responsible for providing informed consent were most often siblings, followed by the children of the tissue donor 

Murilo Martini

Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

Title: Brazil’s Suicide Rate from 2000 to 2014 Stratified by Gender and Age
Speaker
Biography:

Murilo Martini is a medical student at UFRGS. Today he is working in multiple projects, such as “Evaluation of Biochemical and Molecular Parameters of the Brain and their Clinical Correlations in Individuals Who Committed Suicide”, “Brazil’s Suicide Rate from 2000 to 2014 Stratified by Genre and Age” and “Hospital Waste: Is it possible to minimize the environmental impact of a big university hospital?”. He also taught as monitor in “Fundamentals of Microbiology”, “Medical Histology” and “Medical Physiology” classes.

Abstract:

According to WHO, about 800.000 people commit suicide every year. The elderlies have the highest rates of suicide in many countries. Also, men have a higher suicide rate than women. It is not known yet how the proportion of men and women behaves according to age group. In face of that, our objective is to verify Brazil’s suicide rates, stratify by sex and age group, and analyze their variation throughout time, utilizing data from DATASUS, from 2000 to 2014.In 2014, 10.653 suicides were notified in Brazil. Suicide rate is 3,86 higher among men (8,41) when compared to women (2,18). An attenuation of this ratio is observed in ages between 45 and 59 years old, due to an elevation of women’s suicide rate, whose highest rates are in this age group. In the elders, we observe the highest tendency to dissociation: In women, the suicide rate remains stable – tending to decline in the age group of 80+. On the other hand, men present progressive elevation after 65 years old, reaching a peak of 18,22 in 80+ age group.

Simon Gillard

ex NSW Police Officer, Lived Experience of PSTD, Depression and Anxiety

Title: PTSD - Unmasked
Speaker
Biography:

Simon Gillard was a police officer for more than fifteen years, before being invalided out of the force with PTSD. He is now an advocate and educator for others with PTSD, depression, anxiety. Simon lives in Sydney with his wife and three children. His first book, Life Sentence, was released by PRH in May 2017.

Abstract:

My presentation is an informative session around Post Tramuatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and depression education from a lived experience point of view. As a former NSW Police Detective Sergeant who formed PTSD and depression due to work related trauma, my presentation is applicable to all emergency services, military, mental health professionals and the wider community.I discuss the stages of PTSD and depression and how a sufferer wears a mask, why they wear a mask and how a sufferer compartmentalises trauma. Due to external circumstances, a PTSD sufferer can be forced to mask their condition due to fear of career loss, stigma attached, or fear of retribution. 

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Human Immune Deficiency Virus (HIV/AIDS) continues to be an under-recognized risk for suicidal ideation, attempt as well as completion of suicide. Suicidal ideation and attempt in HIV/AIDS is not only a predictor of future attempted suicide and completed suicide. It also reduces quality of life and lead to poor adherence to ART. This study aimed to assess the prevalence and associated factors of suicidal ideation and attempt among people living with HIV/AIDS at Zewditu Memorial Hospital, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. An Institution based cross-sectional study was conducted among HIV-positive patients attending HIV care at Zewditu Memorial Hospital. Systematic random sampling technique was used to recruit 423 participants from April to May 2014. Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to collect data. Multivariable logistic regression was computed to assess factors associated with suicidal ideation and attempt.A total of 417 people living with HIV/AIDs were interviewed with a response rate of 98.6%. Two hundred forty-three (58.3%) of the participants were females. Suicidal ideation and attempt were found to be 22.5% and 13.9% respectively. WHO clinical Stage of HIV (AOR = 6.55, 95% CI: 2.35-18.20), not on HAART (AOR=2.49, 95% CI: 1.07-5.07), depression (AOR=2.45, 95%CI: 1.45-4.12), family history of suicidal attempt (AOR=2.25, 95%CI: 1.01-5.03), and perceived stigma (AOR=1.76, 95%CI: 1.02-3.03) were associated with suicidal ideation. WHO clinical stage (AOR=10.98, 95%CI: 3.56-33.79), being female (AOR=4.48, 95% CI: 1.85-10.81), not on HAART (AOR=3.44, 95% CI: 1.33-8.89), use of substance (AOR=3.39, 95%CI: 1.32-8.73) and depression (AOR=2.04, 95%CI: 1.07-3.87) were associated with suicidal attempt.

  • Bipolar disorder
  • Mental Illness & Health care

Session Introduction

Felicia Johnson

Mental health and youth advocate with Personality Disorders Awareness Network, USA

Title: Survivor To Life Thriver
Speaker
Biography:

Felicia Johnson is a best selling author, international speaker, youth and mental health advocate, and child abuse survivor. Felicia Johnson works in Atlanta with the Highlands Institute and volunteers with Youth Villages Inner Harbour as a Personality Disorders Awreness Network (PDAN). Johnson was nominated for the Gutsy Gals Inspire Me Award of 2014 and Her has been nominated for Georgia Writer's Association Author of The Year Award. She loves ice cream and seeing her little sister smile.

Abstract:

Author and mental health advocate, Felicia Johnson, joins us to discuss her own experience in dealing with a loved one suffering from child abuse, depression and Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD). Inspired by her own life story and the journey of her childhood friend, Felicia has authored the novel, Her, which is the story of a young girl dealing with BPD. Through her book, Felicia helps to bring understanding of BPD within reach of many young people and families afflicted by it and continues to help many come to terms with mental health issues they face.  Johnson brings remarkable insight and understanding to an illness that affects 1 -2 % of the population and wreaks havoc on the lives and relationships of young men and women.  As a survivor of child abuse and one who deals with mental illness in her personal and work life, Felicia is very involved in efforts to end the stigma of mental illness. She has worked for nearly 10 years in the mental health field. 

Jeewaranga Gunasekera

MSc Registrar in Community Medicine, Health Education Bureau, Ministry of Health, Sri Lanka

Title: Prevalence and correlates of work stress among nurses working in psychiatric inward facilities, in Colombo District, Sri Lanka
Speaker
Biography:

Jeewaranga Gunasekera is following his residency in Community Medicine (Public Health). His experience and exposure in mental health / psychiatry services in civil war affected north of Sri Lanka made his public health interest towards mental health and psychiatric services in a community approach. Combining with his other interest in occupational health services, he made recommendations to the mental health unit of ministry of health on worker welfare in psychiatric nursing. He is a reformist and looking forward for a career in public health activities related to occupational health in the country

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Work stress among nurses in psychiatric care is considered an important occupational health problem due to the nature of the services provided.  However, studies on work stress in this study group is scarce in Sri Lanka. An understanding of such factors could greatly help in designing policies related to mental health and occupational health. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among nurses working in the three in-ward psychiatric facilities in capital Colombo District namely, National Institute of Mental Health, National Hospital of Sri Lanka and Colombo South Teaching Hospital. The entire population (N=345) was given a pre-tested self-administered questionnaire composed of two parts; validated Job Content Questionnaire and questionnaire on correlates. Prevalence of Work Stress was measured using two indices as described by Karasek in the dynamic job strain model, namely; ‘High Job Strain’(HJS) and ‘Iso-strain’(IS). Findings: The response rate was 89.5%(N=309). Prevalence of HJS and IS was 37.2% and 21.4% respectively. Factors significantly associated with HJS were; being single (OR=1.84, 95%CI=1.15-2.95), working more than 48 hours weekly (OR=1.71,95%CI=1.05-2.78), violence by patients (OR=3.45,95%CI=1.81-6.57), verbal abuse by patients (OR=3.11, 95%CI=1.80-5.39), mental health concerns (OR=2.68,95%CI=1.595-4.40), stigma (OR=2.21,95%CI=1.24-3.94), lack of assistance at work (OR=4.56,95%CI=1.68-12.27), difficulty in obtaining leave (OR=2.98, 95%CI=1.48-6.00), inadequate welfare facilities (OR=1.62,95%CI=1.01-2.59) and poor work recognition (OR=2.89,95%CI=1.68-4.96). Conclusion & Significance: The prevalence of HJS was significant among nurses. It was comparatively higher than the prevalence values obtained among other occupations. More than ten factors  were identified as increasing the risk of High Job Strain where Iso-strain was associated with five factors. Some factors that are associated with HJS were not associated with IS indicating that positive social support could counter the negative impacts of work stress. Administrative programmes to prevent and reduce work stress among nurses are to be studied in detail. 

  • Womens Mental Health

Session Introduction

Soumen Acharya

National institute of public co operation and child development. New Delhi

Title: The socio psychological study of Santhal tribes of west Bengal and the effect of smoking and drinking on their daily living
Speaker
Biography:

Soumen Acharya is a Consultant at National institute of public co operation and child development, New Delhi.

Abstract:

 A survey of 100 households was conducted on Santhals of Ranibandh block of Bankura district of West Bengal, India. In order to gather information on the socioeconomic aspects, all the members of each household were interviewed. In addition, 100 randomly selected ever-married women were interviewed to collect information on their reproductive profile. Data were collected from 18 villages of Ranibandh block of Bankura district, West Bengal, using multistage random cluster sampling method. Household survey consist information about Primary occupation, Pattern of house, position of kitchen and sources of fuel. Subjects were interviewed to obtain information regarding their Dietary intake, Smoking and Drinking habits and Morbidity pattern. Interview technique was used to gather information from selected ever married women concerning their reproductive profile, consisting Age at menarche, Age at menopause (where applicable), Age at first child, Age at marriage, Status of their children and Number of total children.The drinking habits and smoking habits were seen in man and women . In statistical analysis, Mean and Standard deviation were estimated for Ageof drinking and smoking , Age at menopause, Age at first child and Age at marriage using computerized statistical software, SPSS and MS Excel. Additionally, frequency distribution of Primary occupation, various housing characteristics, dietary habits, Smoking and Drinking habits, Morbidity pattern, Age at first child, Status of children and Number of total children were calculated,