Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 28th International Conference on Psychiatry & Mental Health Melbourne, Australia.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Wai Kwong TANG

The Chinese University of Hong Kong, China

Keynote: Structural and functional MRI correlates of Post stroke Depression

Time : 09:00 AM

Psychiatry & Mental Health 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Wai Kwong TANG photo
Biography:

Professor WK Tang was appointed to professor in the Department of Psychiatry, the Chinese University of Hong Kong in 2011. His main research areas are Addictions and Neuropsychiatry in Stroke. Professor Tang has published over 100 papers in renowned journals, and has also contributed to the peer review of 40 journals. He has secured over 20 major competitive research grants. He has served the editorial boards of five scientific journals. He was also a recipient of the Young Researcher Award in 2007, awarded by the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

Abstract:

Depression is common following an acute stroke. Poststroke Depression (PSD) have notable impacts on the function recovery and quality of life of stroke survivors. Incidence decreased across time after stroke, but prevalence of PSD tend to be stable. Many studies have explored the association between lesion location and the incidence of PSD. For example, lesions in frontal lobe, basal ganglia and deep white matter have been related with PSD. Furthermore, cerebral microbleeds and functional changes in brain networks have also been implicated in the development of PSD. In this presentation, evidences of such association between the above structural and functional brain changes and PSD will be reviewed.Acknowledgement:This project is supported by the following grants.Health and Medical Research Fund, reference number: 02130726 Health and Medical Research Fund, reference number: 01120376 National Natural Science Foundation of China, reference number: 81371460General Research Fund, reference number: 474513General Research Fund, reference number: 473712

Keynote Forum

Victor G. Carrion

Professor and Vice-Chair, Stanford University

Keynote: Neuroscience-informed interventions for youth with history of traumatic stress
Psychiatry & Mental Health 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Victor G. Carrion photo
Biography:

Dr. Carrion is the John A. Turner, M.D. Endowed Professor and Vice-Chair in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University and Director of the Stanford Early Life Stress and Pediatric Anxiety Program. He is in the faculty at both Stanford University School of Medicine and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. His multidisciplinary research on the behavioral, academic, emotional, and biological late effects of experiencing trauma has led to the development and implementation of effective new interventions for treating children who experience traumatic stress. Using Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) as an anchor, Dr. Carrion is investigating, through longitudinal studies, the effects of stress on developmental physiology and brain development and function.

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: 35% of youth living in communities of high violence will develop significant posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms. Current treatment modalities that anchor in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) may leave 20-50% of youth without adequate symptom relieve. New treatment modalities that address executive function, memory and emotion regulation are needed, and access and dissemination should be taken into consideration. This presentation will introduce Stanford’s Cue-Centered Therapy (CCT) and a school-district wide prevention effort that involves yoga and mindfulness in students’ curriculum. CCT integrates elements from CBT with other empirically validated interventions for traumatized youth (psychodynamic therapy, insight, self-efficacy, education). The prevention study focuses on health and wellness through meditation and exercise. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Our research identifying key brain regions (e.g.; hippocampus, amygdala, prefrontal cortex) alterations in structure and function as related to traumatic stress informed the development of CCT. CCT demonstrated effectiveness in reducing anxiety, depression and posttraumatic stress symptoms in a randomized controlled trial. We are currently engaged in treatment outcome research to demonstrate CCT’s efficacy in improving brain function and cognitive and emotional outcomes. Findings: The presentation will focus on our imaging (sMRI and fMRI) and salivary cortisol studies that set the stage for the development of CCT. In addition, sleep was investigated in our prevention study. A curriculum of yoga and mindfulness improves sleep variables and these will be presented. Conclusion & Significance: New treatment modalities and dissemination plans need to be developed to address the highly heterogenous group of children that fall under the diagnostic umbrella of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Approaching both prevention and treatment that are informed by neuroscience research promises to make our interventions more focused and targeted.

  • Bipolar Disorder

Session Introduction

Murilo Martini

Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

Title: Multiple Pathways to PTSD after suicide
Speaker
Biography:

Murilo Martini is a medical student at UFRGS. Today he is working in multiple projects, such as “Evaluation of Biochemical and Molecular Parameters of the Brain and their Clinical Correlations in Individuals Who Committed Suicide”, “Brazil’s Suicide Rate from 2000 to 2014 Stratified by Genre and Age” and “Hospital Waste: Is it possible to minimize the environmental impact of a big university hospital?”. He also taught as monitor in “Fundamentals of Microbiology”, “Medical Histology” and “Medical Physiology” classes

Abstract:

The bereavement period is associated with elevated risk for the onset of trauma related psychiatric disorders, especially when following unexpected and violent death. The sudden loss of a loved one can also be linked with higher levels of grief.The course of illness and psychiatric features following a traumatic loss by suicide of a loved one are illustrated in a single case report.The case presented demonstrates how the traumatic event of losing a loved one by suicide triggered a series of psychiatric symptoms such as insomnia, depression, panic disorder, along with work impairment and difficulty to live by oneself, all of which persisted for over a year. Conclusions: This case study indicates that after suicide a person can develop severe symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder via many factors that operate in the situation, indicating the need of a proper mental health management following suicide.

Speaker
Biography:

Rodrigo Chiavaro da Fonseca is a medical student, interested in research since the beginning of college. Today he is working in multiple projects, such as “Evaluation of Biochemical and Molecular Parameters of the Brain and their Clinical Correlations in Individuals Who Committed Suicide”, “Brazil’s Suicide Rate from 2000 to 2014 Stratified by Genre and Age” and “Hospital Waste: Is it possible to minimize the environmental impact of a big university hospital?”. He is also teaching as monitor in “Promotion and Protection of Elderlies and Adults’ Health” class since 2016, August. Rewarded with the Award of Best Oral Presentation at the 36th Scientific Week of HCPA in 2016.

Abstract:

Childhood trauma is a complex experience, much reported by subjects with bipolar disorder. There are still few studies that assess its consequences in a community sample of bipolar in early stage.The aim of the present study is to assess the association between childhood trauma and clinical outcomes in a community sample of young adults with bipolar disorder.This is a cross-sectional study with a community sample of subjects with bipolar disorder, from 23 to 30 years old, with and without childhood trauma. The trauma experiences during childhood were assessed by Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). The functioning was assessed by Functioning Assessment Short Test (FAST).Ninety subjects with bipolar disorder were included in the study (30 with childhood trauma and 60 without childhood trauma). Young adults with bipolar disorder and childhood trauma showed higher prevalence of current suicide risk, higher severity of depressive symptoms, and higher functioning impairment as compared to subjects with bipolar disorder without childhood trauma,The frequency childhood trauma experiences appear to be an environmental risk factor for worse clinical outcomes and higher functional impairment

 

  • Psychiatry

Session Introduction

Aakriti Gupta

Lady Irwin College, Delhi University

Title: ASSESSMENT OF NUTRITIONAL STATUS OF GERIATRIC SUBJECTS SUFFERING FROM VASCULAR DEMENTIA
Speaker
Biography:

Aakriti Gupta is a PhD scholar from Delhi University, India. She is expertise and passion in the area of micronutrient deficiencies. She has worked extensively in the area of nutritional status of vascular dementia amongst geriatric subjects. She has previously worked in various national level research projects with All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi in the area of Vitamin D deficiency, Pediatric Metabolic Syndrome and Geriatric Nutrition. She has several publications in indexed journals in diverse topics. She has written a chapter on Nutrition and Health in an esteemed textbook of community medicine for postgraduate students.

Abstract:

Introduction: Vascular dementia (VaD) has been shown to have a detrimental effect on the nutritional status of the geriatric population. Whereas, malnutrition has been suggested as an important risk factor for onset and progression of VaD. There is little published data regarding nutritional status of geriatric population suffering with VaD. Hence, the present study was conducted.Method: A hospital based cross-sectional observational study was conducted in the year 2014- 2015 in New Delhi. A total of 48 subjects suffering with VaD confirmed as per NINDS AIREN criteria, aged 55 years and above were enrolled. Data was collected on socio-demographic profile, clinical profile of vascular disease risk factors, mini nutritional assessment, dietary intake (24hr food record and food frequency questionnaire), anthropometric profile from all the subjects.Results: We found that 69% (n=33) of the subjects were at risk of malnutrition. Subjects with moderate VaD had significantly worse nutritional status (p<0.01) as compared to the subjects with mild VaD. With increasing severity of VaD, the nutritional status of the subjects declined significantly (p<0.01). Subjects with moderate VaD had lower nutrient intake and adequacy for all nutrients than subjects with mild VaD.

  • Psychology

Session Introduction

Sandy Joy Weston

Weston Fitness, Philadelphia

Title: Train Your Head… Body Will Follow
Speaker
Biography:

Sandy Joy Weston M.Ed. is the owner of Weston Fitness in Philadelphia. She recieved her Master’s degree in Exercise Physiology from Temple University, and achieved her Bachelor of Science in Dance from West Chester University. Starting as a premiere personal trainer for stars like the 76ers and Flyers, she has now expanded her business to include 8 corporate fitness sites, has a growing blog, book. She speaks all over the world, appearing in magazines, newspapers, and on Television and Radio shows regularly. Sandy lights up a room with her personality and simple system for achieving any goal.

Abstract:

“Train Your Mind, Body Will Follow” takes complicated subjects about the brain and body and breaks it down. From her experience as NBC10 Philadelphia’s Fitness expert, and coaching members of her gym to athletes, Sandy is able to help a wide-range of audiences tap into the power of their mentality. By fusing her expertise on kinesiology and positive psychology, she has created a system which helps her audience cultivate awareness and personal motivation through power statements.The formula was created in collaboration with Professors from Temple University’s Kinesiology Department, and The University of Pennsylvania’s Positive Psychology Department to address the way the mind and body function both separately and together. The components of the presentation, such as the creating power statements, and tracking personal progress are designed to take between 1-3 minutes per day, making it possible for anyone to adapt to this method of positive thinking. In the same way physical therapy patients work on moving certain muscles, they are working to train their brain on reconnecting the association to these muscles, as well. We are training our brain to create action plans through affirmations and cultivating positive habits.This system is designed not to over-complicate things, but present these ideas in a manner that appeal to our innate craving for action. Not only is the awareness of the mind-body connection shown to make us happier, but the fact that we can tap into our motivations through this connection and increase our abilities to meet our goals, as well.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

This research was carried out to find out the effect of Cognitive Restructuring on Attitude towards School and academic performance among NCE students in Kaduna State. Pretest-posttest quasi experimental design was used and eight therapy sessions for Cognitive Restructuring was adapted for the study. Three objectives were applied and two hypotheses were raised to guide the study. Using Stratified sampling technique, fifty (50) participants were randomly selected from the population of 3815 NCE I students of 2015/2016 academic session, Anderson Attitude towards School Instrument Adapted (AATSIA) and modified was used for the data collection while Descriptive Statistics, PPMC and t-test were employed for the data analyses. The results show that cognitive restructuring has significant effects on attitude towards school (t=6.276, p=.000) and there was no difference between attitude towards school between male and female students with (t=1.714, p=.536). Therefore, it was recommended that educational institutions through the support of their owners should provide counselling psychologists who can make use of cognitive restructuring package to change attitude of students towards school so as to encourage effective school learning. 

  • Psychiatry and Psychological disorders
Speaker
Biography:

Christina Chen is a Ph.D. Candidate in Neuroscience at the University of Southern California based in Los Angeles.  She has presented her research at many international scientific conferences and published peer-reviewed articles on sex differences in autism spectrum disorders.  Her current interests include examining the brain structure of boys versus girls with autism exhibiting language deficits and restricted repetitive behavior.

Abstract:

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a mental health condition associated with communication deficits.  Previous studies have examined the relationship between left superior temporal gyrus and receptive language in children with ASD [1].  However, little is known about the neural substrates behind verbal fluency in boys with ASD.  Our goal is to examine the brain regions involved in verbal fluency in boys with ASD, relative to typically developing (TD) boys. Methods: Five research institutions were involved in data collection: USC, UCLA, Seattle Children’s Institute, Harvard, and Yale.  The sample included 52 boys with ASD and 42 TD boys, ages 7 to 17. Diagnosis was based on the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised [2]and Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-II [3].  Verbal fluency was defined as one’s ability to formulate sentences, evaluated by the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals Scale [4].  Freesurfer [5]was used to determine brain surface area for 146 regions extracted from the Destrieux atlas [6].  Regression analyses were performed in each subject group to establish the brain areas that predict verbal fluency.The left straight gyrus (p=.003) and transverse temporal sulcus (p=.006) were significantly related to formulated sentence scores in boys with ASD.  The right temporal plane of superior temporal gyrus (p=.002) and posterior segment of lateral sulcus (p<.001) as well as the left inferior occipital gyrus and sulcus (p=.002) and transverse temporal sulcus (p=.009) were significantly associated with formulated sentence scores in TD boys.  Conclusion: Boys with ASD relied on the left hemisphere, while TD boys relied on both the right and left hemispheres for verbal fluency, suggesting that verbal language laterality may depend on diagnosis.  Furthermore, TD boys appeared to depend more on visual and auditory brain regions to orally express themselves, compared to boys with ASD.  

  • Mental Health-Types

Session Introduction

Rahmi Susanti

Mulawarman University, Samarinda, Indonesia

Title: MAPPING OF STUDENT BULLYING AT PUBLIC ELEMENTARY SCHOOL IN SAMARINDA BY USING EPI INFO, 2016
Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

80% of elementary school students have been bullied both of physically and mentally and the majority occur in the classroom. Indonesia currently in second rank after the Japanese in the case of bullying or violence against children in schools (Indra, 2015). Data Global School-based Student Health Survey (GSHS) shows that the graph of bullying cases in Indonesia has increased since 2007, approximately 40% of students aged 13-15 years in Indonesia reported having been physically assaulted during the last 12 months in their school.The purpose of these research is to mapping of student bullying at public elementary school in Samarinda by using epi info, 2016. Descriptive study to analyze the pattern distribution of school bullying in Samarinda. The location of this study is in Samarinda, where respondents came from 30 public elementary schools in 10 districts. Determination of primary schools to questionnaire determined by local UPTD. The data were processed using Epi Info on the menu help Epi Map. The number of respondents who obtained consisting of 1,491 male and female students. The distribution of the numbers of school bullying was loaded into Samarinda’s map that is divided into 10 districts. Map depicts figures based on chloropeth and dot density per area. Perpetrators of school bullying reaches 544 children and 769 victims of school bullying. districts with the highest offender is Samarinda cities namely 43.50% and districts with the highest casualties are welcome is 57.50% The formation of team competent anti school bullying can be done by the school in order to oversee the incidence of school bullying.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Anne Mantini is a Scientist in the Centre for Urban Health Solutions of St. Michael’s Hospital and consultant to the UNICEF Equity and Access Division Her research program examines public health initiatives and the mental health of refugees, children and youth, women. In particular, she examines how Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and trauma exposure impact on these communities, its treatment through community intervention and training of healthcare providers. The intersection of individual, family, community, policy factors and developmental influences supporting intersectoral interventions, is central to her research.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Refugee children and youth have among the highest rates of PTSD in the world and they make up over half of the population of refugees. Growing evidence suggests that promotion of resiliency is an important component to improvement of symptoms and optimal adaptation. This study examined the efficacy of Narrative Exposure Therapy (NET) treatment, on symptom patterns and development of resiliency, for children and youth with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) compared with untreated children in a wait list control group (WLC) participating in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Measures of behaviour and adaptive development were also utilized. Follow up evaluations were repeated at 3, 6 and 12 months after completion of a course of NET.Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: 300 refugee children and youth (7-25 years of age) with a DSM-V diagnosis of PTSD were randomly assigned to weekly NET sessions (8-12) or the WLC group. The UCLA-PTSD Trauma History and Reaction Index were used to evaluate their symptoms and outcome while measures of behaviour, resiliency, post-traumatic growth and adaptation are also administered at regular intervals.
 

  • Mental health education and Training
Speaker
Biography:

Wai Yee Mak is a final year DHSC (Doctor of Health and Social Care) part time student in the Department of Nursing and Midwifery, the University of West of England Bristol, UK.  He is a Registered Mental Health Nurse, experienced in community psychiatric nursing for more than 20 years in Hong Kong.  His current research interests are Mental Health First Aid, Mental Health Literacy and Stigma.

Abstract:

Many general registered nurses could lack the mental health competencies to identify and treat mental disorder.  Nurses and nursing students view people with mental illness negatively.  Therefore, additional education is required for nursing students.  This study aimed to explore the impact of providing the Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) training to general nursing students and to evaluate their Mental Health Literacy (MHL) and attitude toward mental illness. This is a single site, parallel pilot RCT.  Seventy nursing students randomly assigned to intervention (MHFA plus Usual Education Practice, UEP) or UEP alone.  MHFA is the education programme and UEP is the clinical placement.  The primary outcome was the vignette questionnaire in MHL, secondary outcomes included attitude.  Assessments were conducted at baseline, post-intervention and 6-month follow-up.  Intention to treat and mixed methods were examined. Repeated measure ANOVAs suggested a strong time effect for MHFA group with partial eta-squared = 0.14 from baseline to post-intervention and significant time effect from post-intervention to 6-month follow-up for attitude.  Friedman tests indicated that order effects might influence three vignette responses.  The ANOVAs also supported the attribution model on controllability and dangerousness.  In beliefs about treatment, six categories were grouped as professional, pharmacological intervention, psychiatric assessment, therapeutic communication, problem-solving skills and psychosocial intervention.  Both quantitative and qualitative data concluded the primary outcome variables were statistically non-significant because of random error.

  • Psychiatry & Psychology practice
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Gemma Buston is a PGY3 doctor from the UK. She recently completed a postgraduate diploma in Medical Ethics and Law and is due to commence Psychiatry training in Australia in autumn 2017. 

Abstract:

The Mental Health Act 1983 Code of Practice provides a definition of mental illness as “any disorder or disability of the mind”.This vague definition leaves healthcare professionals with a large amount of flexibility when diagnosing a mental illness. While the Code of Practice recognises that presence of a “mental disorder does not necessarily mean that a patient lacks capacity to give or refuse consent”, section 63’s lack of consideration for consent demonstrates disregard for the patient’s autonomy: “The consent of a patient shall not be required for any medical treatment given to him for the mental disorder from which he is suffering…if the treatment is given by or under the direction of the approved clinician in charge of the treatment.”This author reviewed several cases brought before the UK courts regarding the implementation of section 63: Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust vs RC; Tameside and Glossop Acute Services Trust v CH; St George’s Healthcare Trust v S; R (on the application of B) v Ashworth Hospital Authority; B v Croydon Health Authority; R v Collins and Anor; and An NHS Trust vs Dr A.The review raises several issues including: the lack of clear definition of “mental illness”, its symptoms and consequent “medical treatment”; the use of section 63 to overrule pregnant patients; and the difficulties encountered when deciding whether a patient is experiencing mental illness or merely engaging in a political protest.In all cases reviewed, the overwhelming finding was that the courts always agreed with the doctors. While emphasis on patient choice and respect for patient autonomy is commonplace within medical practice, mental health practice seems to be lagging behind. As long as mental health law favours doctors’ opinions over the opinions of patients with a mental health diagnosis, such patients will be placed at a significant disadvantage.

  • Anxiety & Depression Disorders
Speaker
Biography:

Aamir Saeed Malik is an Associate professor in Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering at Universiti Teknologi Petronas (UTP). He received his BS in EE from Pakistan while MS and Ph.D. from Republic of Korea. He has more than 10 years of working experience. His research interests include 3D imaging, medical imaging, brain sciences and visual surveillance. Currently he is affiliated with Centre for Intelligent Signal and Imaging Research (CISIR) at UTP. He is also senior member IEEE.

Abstract:

Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), a leading cause of functional disability worldwide, is a mental illness. The clinical management of MDD patients has been challenging that includes an early diagnosis. The electroencephalography (EEG)-based studies for diagnosis have shown less clear clinical utilities and warrant further investigations. This research advocates the use of EEG as a biomarker for early diagnosis for unipolar MDD patients. More specifically, an improved feature selection and classification system involving pre-treatment EEG data termed as Intelligent Treatment Management System (ITMS) has been presented. The ITMS involved an integration of the most significant EEG features as input data. The study hypothesized that the MDD patients and healthy controls could be discriminated based on integrating the EEG alpha asymmetry and synchronization likelihood (the EEG measure to quantify the brain functional connectivity). The method helped during diagnosis of MDD patients and was termed as ITMS for diagnosis (ITMS-diagnosis). The proposed ITMS for depression includes a general machine learning (ML) framework for EEG feature extraction, the selection of most noteworthy features that could give high-performance classification models such as the logistic regression (LR), support vector machine (SVM) and naïve bayesian (NB) classifiers. Moreover, the proposed methods have been validated with EEG data involving 34 MDD patients (medication-free) with a confirmed diagnosis of depression and a group of 30 age-matched healthy controls. In addition, the proposed method was validated with 10-fold cross validation (10-CV). Consequently, the EEG features for diagnosis such as the power of alpha band, alpha interhemispheric asymmetry, and synchronization likelihood were extracted from the frontal and temporal regions. The features were found significant for both the MDD diagnosis. Furthermore, the proposed SVM method exhibited diagnosis accuracy = 98.8%, sensitivity=98.6%, specificity=99.4%, and F1-score=0.98. In conclusion, the classification results have proven the proposed ITMS useful for diagnosis of unipolar MDD patients. 

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Globally there are 2.1 million HIV infected adolescents. Mortality due to AIDS related illnesses among adolescents remains unacceptably high, with 120,000 deaths recorded in the year 2013. The trends over the years show that this is increasing, being the only age group with an upward trend in mortality. Kenya is amongst those six countries worldwide that contributes about half of the deaths due to AIDS related illnesses among adolescents. Kenyan adolescents living with HIV face numerous challenges; key amongst them being HIV status disclosure, stigma &discrimination, and adherence to medication. HIV infected adolescents engage in risky sexual behaviors, poly-substance abuse and have been shown to have higher prevalence of depression compared to their HIV uninfected counterparts.

Tracking psychosocial adversities and behavioral outcomes in young people living with HIV provide us with unique insight into developing curative and preventative interventions and allow us to rethink pathways to various services and outreach implementation gaps. Our study highlights HIV associated psychosocial adversities and stresses in the lives of the adolescents visiting the specialist clinic at KNH. We collected extensive survey data mapped on HEADSS domains covering – Health, Education, Alcohol and Drugs, Sexuality functioning of 270 adolescents from ages 10-19 years. While we know our sample participants are in some ways more protected in comparison to others in rural, more remote and in greater poverty context, there are nevertheless critical social determinants and psychosocial adversities that underpin this vulnerable group of young adults. We focus on: food insecurity and household hassles, depression, educational challenges including poor attendance, poor performance, poor social support and attitudes to psychoactive substances, sexuality and disease care that compromise the long term wellbeing of the adolescents. We find that adherence and disclosure rates in the clinic were highly promising however we deliberate upon the profile of young people who are not disclosed to and have challenging family environments. In this sense the paper builds on clusters of participants with vulnerabilities and challenges and discusses how we can address these adversities and stresses in a comprehensive treatment plan

  • Schizophrenia
  • Mental Illness & Health care

Session Introduction

Bin Zhang

Wuhan Medical & Healthcare Center for Women and Children, China.

Title: A study on the Association between gestational weeks and children's psychological behavior development
Speaker
Biography:

Bin Zhang has his expertise in maternal and children health care. He is the dean of Wuhan Medical & Healthcare Center for Women and Children. He achieved some awards in maternal and children health care field, such as the second prize of Wuhan scientific and technological progress because of research on health status of women and children in Wuhan, the third prize of Hubei scientific and technological progress because of screening and epidemiology analysis of cervical cancer and breast cancer among 200 thousand rural women in Wuhan. He has also held a number of social positions, such as the Vice-chairman of Hubei Women and Children Healthcare Association, the Vice-chairman of Children Healthcare Special Committee of Hubei Preventive Medical Association, the Vice-chairman of Hubei Children’s Comprehensive Development Association, the Member of Committee of Clinical and Preventive Group of Hygiene Section of Chinese Medical Association (the Special Commission Group)

Abstract:

To understand the effects of different gestational weeks and delivery method on children's psychological and behavioral development. Methods: 5222 children who were treated by Children's Health Care Center in Wuhan Medical & Healthcare Center for Women and Children from January 2013 to December 2013 were recruited as the study subjects. A retrospective investigation based on a self-made children's neuropsychological development questionnaire was carried out on subjects’ mothers. "0 to 6 years old pediatric neuropsychological development checklist (2005 edition)" revised by the Beijing Institute of Pediatrics was used as standard in children's neuropsychological development test. Univariate analysis, spearman correlation analysis and multiple unconditional logistic regression were applied. Results: There was a positive correlation between gestational weeks and children's psychological behavior evaluation, r = 0.170. The overall score of children's psychological and behavioral development showed a tendency to increase step by step in gestational age, even though there was no significant difference between 33W- 34W, but a rapid increase can be seen in the rest of the week. There was another rapid increase in 37W, 39W and continued to reach a peak at 40W. Fetal movement in 35W, 37W, 38W showed a rapid increase tendency till to 38W to reach the peak; for the fine action the booming growth periods were 35W, 37W, 38W; the adaptability was increased steadily except a swift change in 36W. The language ability suffered two rapid growth in33W, the social behavior score showed a relatively stable trend in the 32W-40W but decline after 41W. There were significant differences in the overall development of psychological behavior between cesarean section and natural childbearing children, and in evaluation distribution between cesarean and normal birth children. Conclusion: There is a positive correlation between the gestational age of childbirth and the psychological behavior evaluation of children.